Texas Impact Voter Information

DON’T PUT THAT VOTER REGISTRATION AWAY YET…PRIMARY RUNOFFS ARE MAY 22

Fewer than 1 in 10 registered voters bothered to cast ballots in Texas’ last midterm primary runoffs–the decisive election for many officials, including Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick.

This year, there are more than 30 runoffs that span all levels of government. See all the races and candidates here

You DO NOT have to have voted in the primary on March 6 to vote in the runoffs! But if you DID vote in the primary, you can only vote in the runoff of the SAME party you chose in March. You DO NOT have to keep that party affiliation forever…in November, you can vote for candidates of all parties.

And good news: even if you didn’t vote in March because you weren’t registered yet, you can still vote in the runoffs as long as you register by April 23. Check to make sure you are registered here

May 22, 2018 Primary Runoffs Key Dates

Last Day to Register to Vote Monday, April 23, 2018
Last Day to Apply by Mail (Received, not Postmarked) Friday, May 11, 2018
First Day of Early Voting Monday, May 14, 2018
Last Day of Early Voting Friday, May 18, 2018
Election Day Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Events from Common Ground for Texans

 Common Ground for Texans

“Advocating positive solutions through civil engagement”

 Have you heard about Seattle’s Democracy Voucher program? It’s a new way of publicly funding local elections by giving residents vouchers that they can donate to qualifying candidates. It encourages more participation in local democracy, and opens the way for candidates who might otherwise lack the financial resources to run for office. The result: a more diverse and representative democracy.

Seattle councilmember Teresa Mosqueda recently visited our city to explain the program. And Austin’s Charter Review Commission is working on a version of our own, called Democracy Dollars, which may be put on the November 2018 ballot. Read more about it on our website — you can download the latest commission draft proposal here.

Also, in case you missed our March 3 meeting on redistricting, you can now watch it on video.

Finally, here are the upcoming meetings we’ve planned. Put these on your calendar now so you’ll be sure not to miss them:

  • Saturday, April 7: Generation Screwed: What did the Baby Boomers leave the Millennials? (at Old Quarry branch library)
  • Saturday, May 5: Finding Common Ground on Criminal Justice Reform (at Wildflower Unitarian Universalist Church, 1314 E. Oltorf)
  • Saturday, June 9: Freedom of Speech, Identity Politics and Political Correctness (at Old Quarry)
  • Saturday, Sept. 8: Election Security in Texas with Dana DeBeauvoir (at Old Quarry)

All events will be from 2 to 4 pm.

Join Common Ground for Texans for our next general meeting, on Saturday, April 7, at Old Quarry branch library when we’ll host a panel discussion about how current American politics and policy harm the future of millennials.

Millenials have taken on 300% more student debt than their parents. They’re only half as likely to own a home as young adults were in 1975. A recent Huffington Post article entitled “Generation Screwed” examines these and other facts about today’s youth, asking whether there are structural disadvantages for young adults today. How is the American Dream faring among millennials?

Our panelists will include diverse experts in zoning, student loans, and engaging millennials in politics. We will discuss each of these issues as they stand today and what we can do to improve them for the future, with:

  • Greg Anderson, City of Austin Planning Commission
  • Amy Stansbury, co-founder, A Functional Democracy
  • Kevin McLaughlin, product manager, Student Loan Genius

Moderated by Mike Ignatowski. We hope you can make it! And please invite friends on Facebook!

 

Texas Impact Voter Information

DON’T PUT THAT VOTER REGISTRATION AWAY YET…

PRIMARY RUNOFFS ARE MAY 22

Fewer than 1 in 10 registered voters bothered to cast ballots in Texas’ last midterm primary runoffs–the decisive election for many officials, including Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick.

This year, there are more than 30 runoffs that span all levels of government. See all the races and candidates here

You DO NOT have to have voted in the primary on March 6 to vote in the runoffs! But if you DID vote in the primary, you can only vote in the runoff of the SAME party you chose in March. You DO NOT have to keep that party affiliation forever…in November, you can vote for candidates of all parties.

And good news: even if you didn’t vote in March because you weren’t registered yet, you can still vote in the runoffs as long as you register by April 23. Check to make sure you are registered here

May 22, 2018 Primary Runoffs Key Dates

Last Day to Register to Vote Monday, April 23, 2018
Last Day to Apply by Mail (Received, not Postmarked) Friday, May 11, 2018
First Day of Early Voting Monday, May 14, 2018
Last Day of Early Voting Friday, May 18, 2018
Election Day Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Vote! VOTE! Vote! VOTE! Vote!

Texas Impact: WE HEARD YOU! 

Our Primary Endorsement Guide is Now Searchable and Sortable…Plus We’ve Added More Endorsers 

The guide now includes endorsements from:

NEW!   TX State Teachers Assoc.

NEW!   Combined Law Enforcement of TX (CLEAT)

Parent PAC (public schools)

TX Association of Business

TX Association of Manufacturers

Grassroots America (constitutional conservatives)

TX Farm Bureau

TX Values (“family values”)

TX Society of Anesthesiologists

NEW! TX AFT (public ed)

NEW! TX Eagle Forum

TX AFL-CIO (unions)

TX Medical Association (doctors)

TX Right to Life (abortion)

TX Home School Coalition

Empower Texans (reduce government)

Young Conservatives of TX

TX Health Care Assoc. (nursing homes)

TX Association of Realtors

The guide helps potential voters make sense of statewide and Texas House and Senate candidates in the 2018 primary election. The guide compares endorsements by many of the state’s most influential endorsers. Wondering who to vote for? The endorsements guide can help you identify the candidates who share YOUR values.

Read the endorsement guide

Early Voting Has Already Begun!  (Feb 20 – Mar 2)

Are you ready to vote? Here’s a checklist to help you head to the polls:

  1. Check your voter registration and find your polling locations here.
  2. Find out what forms of ID are accepted, and what to bring if you don’t have one of the types of photo ID.
  3. Get a copy of your sample ballot from the League of Women Voters to see the races and propositions you’ll vote on.
  4. Print a copy of the Texas Impact Primary Elections Endorsements Guide (or take good notes!) to take to the voting booth! No cell phones are allowed while voting.

Texas Impact’s Message About Voting in the Primary

Watch Texas Impact’s primary voting video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lc4ymeimxc&feature=em-subs_digest.
 
If one citizen is unwilling to participate, all of us are going to suffer. —Barbara Jordan
 

Primary Election

Early voting: February 20 – March 2

Election day: March 6

Primary Election Runoff

(NOTE: When you vote in the runoff you must vote in the same party election as you did in the primary. You cannot switch to vote in the other party’s election.)

Last day to register to vote: April 23

Early voting: May 11 – May 18

Election day: May 22

Get ready to vote!

​Texas Impact’s Endorsements Guide charts endorsements from many orgs across the political spectrum in statewide and ALL #txlege races

  • Use your research to print and fill out a copy of your sample ballot from the League of Women Voters (the ballot is long and this will save time in at the voting booth)
  • Gather your friends, family, and some brand-new voters, like high school students and new Texans for a carpool to GO VOTE! When you’re done, tag @TXImpact with a photo of your I VOTED sticker on Twitter and the hashtag #BeATexasVoter
  • Click here to watch Texas Impact General Counsel Joshua Houston explain why voting in the primary matters

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(Photo “VOTE” by Theresa Thompson used under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License.)

Mark Your Calendars

From The League Of Women Voters

League of Women Voters:  STOP VOTER SUPPRESSION

Across the country, there has been a concerted effort in many states to stop some voters from voting, or to make it much harder for them to participate – and there promises to be more to come in 2017. Legislators and election officials have purged existing voters from the rolls, made cuts to early voting, reduced polling places, put in place strict voter photo ID laws and levied onerous voter registration restrictions.

All of these actions have been made easier by the Supreme Court’s decision to gut key provisions of the Voting Rights Act in 2013. The 2016 election was the first presidential election in 50 years without full protection of the right to vote.

The League remains committed to fighting suppression tactics that threaten our democracy and the right to vote. In addition, throughout 2016, the League worked to make sure voters impacted by new laws were aware of these restrictions. In Ohio, the League made thousands of phone calls to inform voters about that state’s purge. In Virginia, the League conducted outreach so voters knew how the state’s new voter photo ID law might affect them. In Kansas, the League fought tirelessly to protect the rights of voters caught in the crosshairs of the state’s illegal and discriminatory attempts to restrict voter registration Across the country, thousands of League volunteers served as non-partisan poll observers, staffed voter protection hotlines, and made sure get-out-the-vote phone banks reached as many voters as possible.

The League is gearing up to take a stand in Congress, statehouses and courtrooms nationwide to ensure no voters are left behind. Stand with the League in our fight to ensure our elections are always free, fair, and accessible.